Franklin Tennessee's Number 1 Law Firm, Johnston and Street, PLLC
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Criminal Law

Know when to deal and when to fight.

 

Our attorneys strive to protect the rights and freedom or our clients.

 

We can help you understand the charges you are facing and give you information to help you make an informed decision on which route you would like to take. Being charged with a crime can be a scary experience. We are here to help you understand the different stages of criminal proceedings and what happens during the criminal process.

Misdemeanors & Felonies

Tennessee distinguishes among offenses based on their seriousness. These offenses range from minor misdemeanors to felonies, which include capital crimes.

Misdemeanors: A Tennessee misdemeanor carries the following maximum terms of imprisonment and fines:

Class A misdemeanor: Not greater than eleven (11) months, twenty-nine (29) days or a fine not to exceed two thousand five hundred dollars ($2,500), or both, unless otherwise provided by statute.

Class B misdemeanor: Not greater than six (6) months or a fine not to exceed five hundred dollars ($500), or both, unless otherwise provided by statute.

Class C misdemeanor: Not greater than thirty (30) days or a fine not to exceed fifty dollars ($50.00), or both, unless otherwise provided by statute.

Felonies:  A Tennessee felony carries the following maximum terms of imprisonment and fines:

Class A felony: Not less than fifteen (15) nor more than sixty (60) years. In addition, the jury may assess a fine not to exceed fifty thousand dollars ($50,000), unless otherwise provided by statute.

Class B felony: Not less than eight (8) nor more than thirty (30) years. In addition, the jury may assess a fine not to exceed twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000), unless otherwise provided by statute.

Class C felony: Not less than three (3) years nor more than fifteen (15) years. In addition, the jury may assess a fine not to exceed ten thousand dollars ($10,000), unless otherwise provided by statute.

Class D felony: Not less than two (2) years nor more than twelve (12) years. In addition, the jury may assess a fine not to exceed five thousand dollars ($5,000), unless otherwise provided by statute.

Class E felony: Not less than one (1) year nor more than six (6) years. In addition, the jury may assess a fine not to exceed three thousand dollars ($3,000), unless otherwise provided by statute.

Probation Violations

Probation is a type of sentence where a person is not placed in jail but released and monitored for a certain period of time and under certain conditions. Probation is usually coupled with a suspended sentence.

If you violate any condition of your probation, generally your probation officer will file a probation violation warrant that sets out the reasoning of your violation. If a judge rules that you have violated your probation, the judge may send you to jail for the full amount of time of your suspended sentence. If a judge finds that you have violated your probation, the judge may put you back on probation or the judge could order a combination of both jail time and probation. If a judge finds that you have violated your probation, the judge may place additional conditions on your probation or increase the amount of time of your probation. You may appeal a probation violation but they are rarely successful.

Diversion & Expungement

Diversion allows your charge or charges to be diverted for an agreed amount of time once you plead guilty and agree to conditions given by the judge. Once the period of diversion has been completed successfully, you MUST return to court to request an expungement.

Expungement is the process to remove a charge or charges from your criminal record. There is a fee to expunge your diverted charge plus court fees and costs.

 

 

If you want an answer now, email us or give us a call.